Sunday, 13 October 2013

Facebook exterminates search privacy setting


Still hiding in Facebook's shadows? Not for much longer.


The company announced Thursday it is officially axing a privacy setting that allowed people to hide their profiles from other users in Facebook's search field.

The setting "who can look up my timeline by name" had already disappeared from the options for some users -specifically, those who weren't using the feature in December of last year.Thursday's change affects a "small percentage of people" on the site who were still using the feature, Facebook (FB, Fortune 500) said, although it did specify how many of its 1.15 billion active users were impacted.

Related: Tech stocks partying like its 1999

Facebook explained that the tool was outdated, because users could be found in other ways, either by clicking on their name in a mutual friend's Timeline or News Feed. The social network also said people became confused when they were unable to find a friend via search.

It's the latest development in Facebook's long-running privacy saga. Frequent changes to its privacy settings have confused some users, and controversial statements from CEO Mark Zuckerberg about how people shouldn't be doing the things they want to keep secret in the first place.

Earlier this year, Facebook expanded its internal search capabilities with the roll out of Graph Search. The feature allows users to sift through the social network's vast data trove to find "friends who live in my city," "tourist attractions in Italy visited by my friends," and similar lists. It also allows Facebook to eventually challenge sites that rate and rank local attractions like restaurants and hotels.

Facebook noted in the announcement that it provides other privacy settings, including control over the visibility of each individual post.

Source: Gregory Wallace @CNNMoneyTech

Sunday, 6 October 2013

"...I don't run too well myself, and he will need someone who understands..."

A farmer had some puppies he needed to sell. He painted a sign advertising the 4 pups, and set about nailing it to a post on the edge of his yard.



As he was driving the last nail into the post, he felt tug on his overalls.

He looked down into the eyes of a little boy.

"Mister," he said, "I want to buy one of your puppies."

"Well," said the farmer, as he rubbed the sweat of the back of his neck, "these puppies come from fine parents and cost a good deal of money."

The boy dropped his head for a moment. Then reaching deep into his pocket,he pulled out a handful of change and held it up to the farmer. "I've got thirty-nine cents. Is that enough to take a look?"

"Sure," said the farmer. And with that he let out a whistle. "Here Dolly!" he called.

Out from the doghouse and down ramp ran Dolly followed by four little balls of fur.

The little boy pressed his face against the chain link fence. His eyes danced with delight.

As the dogs made their way to the fence, the little boy noticed
something else stirring inside the doghouse.

Slowly another little ball appeared, this one noticeably smaller.

Down the ramp it slid. Then in a awkward manner, the little pup began hobbling toward the others, doing its best to catch up....

"I want that one," the little boy said, pointing to the runt.

The farmer knelt down at the boy's side and said, "Son, you don't want that puppy. He will never be able to run and play with you like these other dogs would."

With that the little boy stepped back from the fence, reached down, and began rolling up one leg of his trousers. In doing so he revealed a steel brace running down both sides of his leg attaching itself to a specially made shoe.

Looking back up at the farmer, he said, "You see sir, I don't run too well myself, and he will need someone who understands."

With tears in his eyes, the farmer reached down and picked up the little pup. Holding it carefully he handed it to the little boy.

"How much?" asked the little boy.

"No charge," answered the farmer, "There's no charge for love."

{Source: TheSilentForce}

Facebook editing function raises concern

A new feature allowing Facebook users to edit their status updates may result in “stitch-ups”, an expert has warned.


Previously, an update would have to be deleted and reposted with any changes, losing any comments or “likes”.

But the new capability, introduced to help users correct spelling and grammatical errors, means posts can be modified, and their content changed.

Facebook users who liked or interacted with the original post are not notified of any changes made.

A spokesman for Facebook explained that the update was intended to help people address typos or auto-correct errors, but wouldn’t comment on the potential vulnerabilities.

The capability to edit posts is already available on rival social networks, and Facebook has allowed its users to edit photo updates and their comments on other people’s updates for some months.

However, the lack of notifications means that users who may have liked an innocuous post, such as “I love my cat”, could find their name beside a post which says something entirely different, or even offensive.

“The latest update from Facebook to allow editing of posts after they have been published raises some real concerns amongst individuals I know and business clients of mine,” Kieran Hannon, director of social media consultancy eSocialMedia, said

“A like or a comment made on a previously static piece of content is now open to misinterpretation— a fact that many less informed users are currently unaware of.

“The opportunity to ‘stitch up’ friends or foes on Facebook has increased dramatically,” said Kieran Hannon director, eSocialMedia

The editing facility comes after Facebook revealed more than half its users accessed the site on mobile phones, which are more prone to typing errors.

“It’s unlikely this will have any impact beyond making it easier to correct spelling mistakes,” said Matt Owen, of digital business specialists Econsultancy.

“If this update allows people to stay in control of their social profile, ultimately they will be happier with it and use the product more.
“It’s a win-win for both Facebook and its users.”

The new edit feature does not yet apply to company pages.

But Hannon says he will be advising his business clients to be cautious.

“It is a concern that a brand could like or comment on a post that is later updated to something that undermines or potentially damages the company’s brand,” he said.

{Source:Reuters}